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Special Constables receive briefing on Warwickshire Police plans

South Warwickshire Police Special Constables were briefed on the force’s vulnerability strategy, Professional Standards and new technology developments, such as Body Worn Video, at a district meeting at Stratford-upon-Avon School on Tuesday, 21 February 2017. Special Constables are unpaid, part-time police officers who work in some of the most important areas of policing, using their…
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South Warwickshire Police Special Constables were briefed on the force’s vulnerability strategy, Professional Standards and new technology developments, such as Body Worn Video, at a district meeting at Stratford-upon-Avon School on Tuesday, 21 February 2017.

Special Constables are unpaid, part-time police officers who work in some of the most important areas of policing, using their spare time to make a difference. They have full police powers, wear a police uniform and work alongside regular police officers and police staff.

Special Chief Inspector David Watts, who organised the briefing, said: “Our vision of protecting people from harm is at the core of everything we do. It is a vision that is understood and delivered daily by those who work for us – police officers, police staff, Police Support Volunteers and Special Constables”.

“Our ambition is for us to be great at protecting the most vulnerable. The briefing enabled Special Constables to understand the important role they have in delivering our vulnerability strategy. It also enabled the Special Constables to understand what we are doing to meet the Looking to 2020 programme, the plan that sets out how Warwickshire Police and West Mercia Police see the future of policing in the areas served by the forces.”

The Special Constables also received a presentation about the role and responsibilities of the Professional Standards Department. The department’s main function is to protect the public from harm by protecting the integrity of the police force and those who work for them through its Anti-Corruption Unit, the Misconduct and Complaints Team, and its Vetting Unit.

The Special Constables attending the presentation were briefed about the importance of upholding professional standards; safeguarding organisational integrity; interacting with members of the public, partners and staff in a fair, ethical and transparent manner; and supporting investigations that pursue alleged wrongdoers and protect the innocent.

Body Worn Video (BWV) will be rolled out to Warwickshire Police officers in a phased approach over 2017, following the confirmation of financial backing by Warwickshire’s Police and Crime Commissioner to fund the technology.

Special Chief Inspector Watts said: “The briefing enabled Special Constables to understand that BWV helps build public confidence in the police by increasing transparency as well as allowing us to secure stronger evidence to support our fight against crime, and contributes to a significant reduction in complaints against officers”.

The introduction of BWV is part of the Looking to 2020 programme being undertaken by Warwickshire Police in its strategic alliance with West Mercia Police. The programme will equip officers with the latest technology, such as smart phones and tablets, in order to work in the most effective and efficient way.

For more information about Looking to 2020, visit www.warwickshire.police.uk/lookingto2020

Information about the roles and responsibilities of Special Constables can be found at www.westmercia.police.uk/specialconstables

Issued: 8:30am, 22 February, Dave Hollands, Corporate Communications

 

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